The Culinary Life https://www.theculinarylife.com Get fearless in the kitchen with Stephanie Stiavetti Thu, 23 Apr 2015 03:06:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.3 Refreshing Pistachio Parsley Pesto https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/refreshing-pistachio-parsley-pesto-recipe/ https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/refreshing-pistachio-parsley-pesto-recipe/#comments Wed, 22 Apr 2015 05:00:09 +0000 http://www.theculinarylife.com/?p=8623 - This parsley pesto would have saved me. Sigh. - I’ve got a confession to make: I ate my first McDonald’s burger in YEARS last week. I was stuck in an airport late at night, starving, and I’d exhausted all of the healthy snacks in my bag. No other “restaurants” were open and I was […]

The post Refreshing Pistachio Parsley Pesto appeared first on The Culinary Life.

]]>
Refreshing Parsley Pistachio Pesto on theculinarylife.com

- This parsley pesto would have saved me. Sigh. -

I’ve got a confession to make: I ate my first McDonald’s burger in YEARS last week. I was stuck in an airport late at night, starving, and I’d exhausted all of the healthy snacks in my bag. No other “restaurants” were open and I was a quarter mile past hangry, to the point that I was about to pose a serious health risk to any airline staff who might get between me and a bag of peanuts. So I took a deep breath, plunked down my $1.49, and bought a cheeseburger.

(If I’m being totally honest, I was so hungry that it was the most delicious thing I’ve ever eaten.)

 

Refreshing Parsley Pistachio Pesto on http://www.theculinarylife.com

 - Parsley pesto – or any pesto, really – is easy to make. -

What does this have to do with pistachio parsley pesto?

The problem wasn’t that I was caught in an airport in the middle of the night, or that there was nowhere else to eat, or even that I was hungry to begin with. The problem was that I was not prepared. I usually carry real food in my bag when I travel, like these flax muffins with raspberries, but I’d just been too tired and stressed to pack anything beyond an apple and a few packets of nuts. I also hate dealing with the TSA food nazis, who seem to think hummus is a hazardous substance, and I didn’t want to play the “Is this considered a liquid?” game. (No, overly empowered TSA manager, hummus is not a liquid. Thanks for playing.)

Sheepishly, I must admit that I even wrote a whole post on avoiding food at airports. So I really have no excuse.

 

Refreshing Parsley Pistachio Pesto on http://www.theculinarylife.com

- Pesto, in media res. -

The burger did not sit well. Fast food usually upsets my stomach, and I spent the rest of the night feeling like someone kicked me in the gut. I had plenty of time to think about my food choices on the long trip home, in between twisting uncomfortably in my seat and begging the flight attendant for a Tums.

Last time I made this flight, I’d packed the perfect travel meal: a takeout container full of parsley pesto over pasta, with pistachios added for a little extra love. It whips up quickly in a food processor and keeps well at room temperature for hours. With only a handful of ingredients and five minutes worth of actual work, I had prepared and packed a simple, delicious meal that had carried me through the night and left me feeling good the next day. Somewhere over the Great Plains, I deeply regretted not bringing any.

The awesome thing about this parsley pesto is that you can do so much with it. Hate mayo? Spread pesto on your next sandwich. Need an appetizer? Serve pesto alongside thinly sliced sourdough bread. Need a way to brighten a boring steak or chicken breast? A dollop of pesto provides a mega-dose of BIG FLAVOR WITH ALL CAPS.

Pesto even freezes well, so you can make a big batch and freeze it in ice cube trays for the world’s easiest single-serving dinner.

Once I got home and managed to somehow digest the offending burger, I needed something simple to eat that wouldn’t zap the little energy I had left after traveling. I found a bunch of parsley in the fridge and a managed to dig up a handful of pistachios from the cupboard. In less than ten minutes I had a huge bowl of steaming pasta smothered with seriously flavorful parsley pesto.

I might not have had it when I needed it last night, but it will do me perfectly right now.

 

Refreshing Parsley Pistachio Pesto on http://www.theculinarylife.com

... Read the rest of Refreshing Pistachio Parsley Pesto on The Culinary Life.


Permalink | Posted in Main Dishes, Recipes, Savory, Soup, Salads, Sides, Vegan and Vegetarian on Apr/Tue/2015
Post tags: , , ,
© Stephanie Stiavetti for The Culinary Life, 2015.

The post Refreshing Pistachio Parsley Pesto appeared first on The Culinary Life.

]]>
https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/refreshing-pistachio-parsley-pesto-recipe/feed/ 4
Cheese 101: How to Store Cheese https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/how-to-store-cheese/ https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/how-to-store-cheese/#comments Wed, 08 Apr 2015 20:15:34 +0000 http://www.theculinarylife.com/?p=15691 - Helpful tips on how to store cheese. –  Did it happen again? Did you spend $50 at your local cheese counter, and now you’ve got more cheese than a normal human being can possibly consume in a week? Don’t worry, you’re not alone. *sheepish smile* But now you’re faced with an important question: How are you going to store […]

The post Cheese 101: How to Store Cheese appeared first on The Culinary Life.

]]>
How to Store and Care for Fine Cheese

- Helpful tips on how to store cheese. – 

Did it happen again? Did you spend $50 at your local cheese counter, and now you’ve got more cheese than a normal human being can possibly consume in a week? Don’t worry, you’re not alone. *sheepish smile* But now you’re faced with an important question: How are you going to store all this cheese, and will it go bad if you don’t eat it right away?

How to Store Cheese, 101

Many cheeses can last a few weeks in the refrigerator, as long as they are stored properly. The goal is to let the cheese breathe while at the same time keeping it from drying out, so your best bet is to wrap it in a finely porous material, such as cheese paper or breathable plastic wrap made especially for cheese (like you see in the image above). These wrappers control the amount of moisture at the surface of the cheese while still allowing oxygen to move in and out of the packaging. All of these factors make for a substantially longer lifespan in your fridge.

When it comes to storing cheese, regular plastic wrap won’t cut it as standard plastic does not allow breathability. Cheese is a living, breathing thing, and without proper oxygen, it will suffocate (and there goes your investment in the good life!). In a pinch you can use aluminum foil, but if you’re a regular cheese shopper, it might be worth it to invest in some specially designed cheese paper.

Don’t have any fancy cheese paper lying around? Never fear, my dear – regular old parchment paper will work just fine when it comes to storing cheese. Do not wrap your cheese too tightly, as you want the air to be able to circulate, but don’t wrap it so loosely that it will dry out. Secure the paper with a small piece of tape, then wrapping it loosely in plastic wrap to help trap a little moisture. Voila, well-stored cheese.

How to Store Blue Cheese (which has slightly special needs)

Blue cheese is a little different, given that special molds are added to the curds to give them their signature spicy bite. These molds have their own special needs. If you’re storing a blue variety, feel free to wrap it in aluminum foil; in fact, you might have noticed that some of the blue cheeses you buy come wrapped in foil already.

A Heavenly Cheese Oasis

It’s a good idea to keep cheese in your crisper (the drawer in your refrigerator made to store vegetables). These little drawers are actually somewhat climate-controlled to keep your veggies fresher for longer, and they perform the same function when it comes to keeping cheese. Some fridges even have a cheese drawer, in which case use that.

How Long Can You Store Cheese?

Most hard, aged cheeses will last up to a month or longer when kept properly, and semi-firm cheeses can last up for two to three weeks if conditions are ideal. Soft cheeses can ammoniate if held improperly or for long periods of time, so try to eat those quickly.

If you’ve stored your cheese for a while and you notice a few spots of fuzzy mold growing on it, don’t panic. Remember that cheese is fermented with a series of molds and bacterias, so if you notice a little patch of extra mold here or there, it’s perfectly safe to scrape it off. If the cheese has been completely overtaken by mold, well, give it a burial at sea.

Storing Cheese In the Freezer?

And, because someone always asks: Please, for the love of god, don’t freeze your cheese, ok? Dairy does not generally take well to freezing, especially soft or semi-firm cheeses. That said, I’ve stored hard cheeses, such as Parmigiano-Reggiano and Pecorino in the freezer and it defrosted surprisingly well. But as a general rule, don’t freeze cheese!


Permalink | Posted in Cheese on Apr/Wed/2015
Post tags: , ,
© Stephanie Stiavetti for The Culinary Life, 2015.

The post Cheese 101: How to Store Cheese appeared first on The Culinary Life.

]]>
https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/how-to-store-cheese/feed/ 5
Cheese 101: Andante’s Metronome Cheese – Mixed-Milk Splendor https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/andantes-metronome-cheese/ https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/andantes-metronome-cheese/#comments Wed, 30 Nov -0001 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.theculinarylife.com/?p=15183 - Meet Metronome cheese, for serious lovers of mixed-milk flavor. - Named after the ticking device used by musicians to keep their rhythm while practicing, Metronome is a gorgeous pyramid of precocious mixed-milk personality. The cheesemaker, Soyoung Scanlan of Andante Dairy, hand-crafts Metronome cheese in a shape traditionally reserved only for goat cheeses, giving Metronome an air of […]

The post Cheese 101: Andante’s Metronome Cheese – Mixed-Milk Splendor appeared first on The Culinary Life.

]]>
Andante Metronome Cheese

- Meet Metronome cheese, for serious lovers of mixed-milk flavor. -

Named after the ticking device used by musicians to keep their rhythm while practicing, Metronome is a gorgeous pyramid of precocious mixed-milk personality. The cheesemaker, Soyoung Scanlan of Andante Dairy, hand-crafts Metronome cheese in a shape traditionally reserved only for goat cheeses, giving Metronome an air of mystery for anyone schooled in the art of traditional French cheesemaking.

Set all preconceived notions aside, though; before your first bite you may expect the playful tang of goat’s milk, but a quick sweep of Metronome’s rich paste across your palate yields a different experience altogether. An intriguing blend of cow and goat’s milk, this cheese’s firm texture yields near the edges for a rich, buttery creamline, but what makes this cheese truly special is its paste. Metronome loves to float across your tongue like a sonata, smooth in its personality but with enough texture to hold your attention.

Both grassy and tart, the twang of goat milk picks its way through the fatty notes of a chorus provided by Northern California Jersey cows. Metronome cheese goes just as well alongside slow-roasted tomatoes as it does standard cheese plate offerings, such as dried fruit and Marcona almonds.

If you happen across this pyramidal monolith, grab as many as you can carry!


Permalink | Posted in Cheese on Mar/Wed/2015
Post tags: ,
© Stephanie Stiavetti for The Culinary Life, 2015.

The post Cheese 101: Andante’s Metronome Cheese – Mixed-Milk Splendor appeared first on The Culinary Life.

]]>
https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/andantes-metronome-cheese/feed/ 4
15-Minute Honey Thyme Orange Chicken Recipe https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/15-minute-honey-thyme-orange-chicken-recipe/ https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/15-minute-honey-thyme-orange-chicken-recipe/#comments Wed, 11 Mar 2015 15:00:16 +0000 http://www.theculinarylife.com/?p=10315 - A super-fast orange chicken recipe for those “I don’t want to cook” nights. - I have a ridiculous number of cookbooks – over 700 at last count, and that was over a year ago – so at this point I’ve become very discerning over which cookbooks I’m willing to spend my money on. I […]

The post 15-Minute Honey Thyme Orange Chicken Recipe appeared first on The Culinary Life.

]]>
15 Minute Orange Thyme Honey Chicken on http://www.theculinarylife.com

- A super-fast orange chicken recipe for those “I don’t want to cook” nights. -

I have a ridiculous number of cookbooks – over 700 at last count, and that was over a year ago – so at this point I’ve become very discerning over which cookbooks I’m willing to spend my money on. I mean, you can only own so many baking books before you see the same brownie recipe pop up 15 or 20 or even 50 times. To say I have cookbook ennui would be an understatement. Or maybe it’s not ennui; it just takes a lot more to give me excited about a cookbook these days.

In case you think I’m kidding (and these are just the ones in the bedroom):

When I buy cookbooks now, I tend to look for those that are unique in some way, or teach me something I don’t know. Some of my favorite books cover a single subject exhaustively, diving deep into one topic and ferreting out everything there is to know about it. I never used to be a fan of single subject books, but now they’re the ones I look to the most.

Last year I found a really awesome German cookbook from two authors I’d never heard of before – it’s called The German Kitchen, by Christopher and Catherine Knuth. I featured it in a post about European cookbooks as Christmas gifts over a year ago, but since then I’ve had a chance to dig in and really give the recipes a workout. I’m always on the lookout for quick and easy dinner recipes that will make my life a hell of a lot easier, especially after a long crazy day, and one dish really stood out and became one of my weeknight dinner time staples. W00t! I love it when that happens, and it happens so rarely these days. (See above mentioned cookbook ennui.) ... Read the rest of 15-Minute Honey Thyme Orange Chicken Recipe on The Culinary Life.


Permalink | Posted in Gluten Free, Grain Free and Low Carb, Main Dishes, Recipes on Mar/Wed/2015
Post tags: , , , , , , ,
© Stephanie Stiavetti for The Culinary Life, 2015.

The post 15-Minute Honey Thyme Orange Chicken Recipe appeared first on The Culinary Life.

]]>
https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/15-minute-honey-thyme-orange-chicken-recipe/feed/ 10
Hold Up! Action Required! https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/hold-action-required/ https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/hold-action-required/#respond Mon, 09 Mar 2015 15:20:17 +0000 http://www.theculinarylife.com/?p=15367 As you’re probably well aware, I have a newsletter for my cooking projects, TheCulinaryLife and FearlessFresh. In the new plan for 2015, this newsletter is where I will teach you how to be a culinary ninja. First, I want to say that it’s been awesome having you as a reader and I really appreciate you being here. Since it’s almost spring, it’s about time I […]

The post Hold Up! Action Required! appeared first on The Culinary Life.

]]>
As you’re probably well aware, I have a newsletter for my cooking projects, TheCulinaryLife and FearlessFresh. In the new plan for 2015, this newsletter is where I will teach you how to be a culinary ninja.

First, I want to say that it’s been awesome having you as a reader and I really appreciate you being here.

Since it’s almost spring, it’s about time I did a little mailing list housekeeping. My newsletter has grown a lot since I started it in 2010, and as a result there are a lot of folks who seem to have faded into the background. That’s totally cool, but I want to make sure each and every person on this list is engaged and interested in what I’m doing. (And cooking!)

So here’s what’s happening:

I’m going to be deleting the current list very soon, and if you want to keep receiving email updates from me, I need you to join my new list by filling out this form. A few minutes later an email will pop into your inbox asking you to click a link and confirm your subscription. That’s it.

Note: If you don’t click this confirmation link in your inbox, you won’t be moved over to the new list.

Once you’re on the new list, you’ll keep receiving weekly updates on how to tame and reclaim your kitchen. If you don’t move over to the new list, you’ll stop receiving emails from me within a few weeks.

I really hope you’ll come on over and join in the fun! 2015 is going to be a big year:

  • I’ll be launching FearlessFresh in the spring, and there will be much fanfare and many kitchen equipment giveaways.
  • Get ready for some important topics that will turn your kitchen into a happy place, with tips and recipes to make you feel like a total culinary badass.
  • A new series on ways to de-stress dinner, eat fast and healthy on a budget, and how to pump up the flavor in even the simplest dishes.
  • If you’re feeling a little more adventurous, I’ll also be covering some really cool weekend cooking projects that will tickle your DIY, slow-food funny bone. W00t!
  • And finally, there will be FREE webinars to workshop specific dishes and answer your burning culinary questions.

I do hope you’ll hop over and join me in the new list.​ Or if you’d like to completely unsubscribe, you’ll find a link for that below.

Happy March!


Permalink | Posted in Miscellaneous on Mar/Mon/2015
Post tags:
© Stephanie Stiavetti for The Culinary Life, 2015.

The post Hold Up! Action Required! appeared first on The Culinary Life.

]]>
https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/hold-action-required/feed/ 0
Cheese 101: Bonne Bouche https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/cheese-101-bonne-bouche/ https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/cheese-101-bonne-bouche/#respond Wed, 30 Nov -0001 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.theculinarylife.com/?p=15351 I have a favor to ask. Please, right this very second, go to your local cheese shop and ask for Vermont Creamery’s Bonne Bouche. This little puck of goaty love has become one of my most favorite things in the world, and I want nothing more than for you to fall in love with it also. Bonne Bouche […]

The post Cheese 101: Bonne Bouche appeared first on The Culinary Life.

]]>
Bonne Bouche

I have a favor to ask. Please, right this very second, go to your local cheese shop and ask for Vermont Creamery’s Bonne Bouche. This little puck of goaty love has become one of my most favorite things in the world, and I want nothing more than for you to fall in love with it also.

Bonne Bouche is a whimsical, intriguing goat cheese. Creamy, rich, buttery, salty, mushroomy, peppery, sour… the list goes on and on. It seems that every person who tastes it takes away something different. My first impression of Bonne Bouche goat cheese was big on salt and funk, but my friend, who sampled the very same cheese right alongside of me, sensed more of a mushroomy impact followed by an assertive sour note. A second tasting revealed a distinct layer of cured bacon, and a third had me swearing I tasted a quick smack of crème fraîche. Bonne Bouche is all of these things, and that’s what makes it such a winner.

This diminutive ash-ripened cheese sits nestled in a darling wooden crate, which gives it a little support during packing and shipping. Bonne Bouche is incredibly runny and should be purchased only when it has lazily relaxed across the entire expanse of said crate, and without the structure of the box, there’s no way this cheese could ship outside of a sealed plastic container (which would prevent the cheese from ripening…and smelling up your refrigerator).

Aged for only 10 days before it leaves the creamery in Vermont, Bonne Bouche reaches perfect ripeness somewhere between 8 and 15 days after that. The inside of the cheese should be entirely smooth and buttery, so if you’ve got an under ripe specimen that is still resistant to the poke of a finger, allow the cheese to ripen in your refrigerator until it relaxes to the point that it nearly melts into its little crate. Then bring it to room temperature, set it on a plate, and allow Bonne Bouche to spread its creamy finger as far and wide as it likes. When you’re done, control your urge to lick the plate. Or don’t. I won’t judge.


Permalink | Posted in Cheese on Mar/Wed/2015
Post tags: , , ,
© Stephanie Stiavetti for The Culinary Life, 2015.

The post Cheese 101: Bonne Bouche appeared first on The Culinary Life.

]]>
https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/cheese-101-bonne-bouche/feed/ 0
One-Pot Butterflied Brown Sugar Mustard Chicken Recipe https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/one-pot-butterflied-brown-sugar-mustard-chicken-recipe/ https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/one-pot-butterflied-brown-sugar-mustard-chicken-recipe/#comments Wed, 30 Nov -0001 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.theculinarylife.com/?p=12043 - A mustard chicken recipe that might keep you from jumping off a bridge. Because chicken is magical. - Snow. Lots of it. Ice on the roads and sidewalks. Gray skies popping in and out of visibility between equally monochromatic buildings and lampposts. If you’re anywhere near the northern and/or eastern part of the country, this is […]

The post One-Pot Butterflied Brown Sugar Mustard Chicken Recipe appeared first on The Culinary Life.

]]>
One-Pot Butterflied Brown Sugar Mustard Chicken on http://www.theculinarylife.com

- A mustard chicken recipe that might keep you from jumping off a bridge. Because chicken is magical. -

Snow. Lots of it. Ice on the roads and sidewalks. Gray skies popping in and out of visibility between equally monochromatic buildings and lampposts. If you’re anywhere near the northern and/or eastern part of the country, this is your reality right now. Still bundled up in mittens and earmuffs and wool socks, coat zipped all the way up to your eyeballs, halfheartedly greeting each new day along with the additional four inches of snow it’s brought with it. All of this snow makes me think of one word, and it starts with “F.”

Or are you one of the lucky few out in California who are celebrating each and every 70-degree day that popped out of nowhere this February? Are you aware that it was 90 degrees in Sacramento last week?

No, I’m not bitter. Not at all.

Nor am I busting my jeans from all the comfort food I’m stuffing down my gullet to try and maintain some semblance of sanity, while my 5500k therapy lamp burns another few dollars worth of electricity to keep me from pulling a Sylvia Plath and putting my head in the oven. (Before you call 911 and send the cops to my doorstep, that’s hyperbole. But thanks anyways.)

Even for us sugarplum fairies who adore all the moronically frigid charms of winter, the middle of February can suck at a nuclear level. For anyone who happens to be living north of, say, Florida, staring down the barrel of another four weeks of this crap may seem like a life (or death) sentence.

That’s why God made chickens, nature’s depression food. I once had a friend who knew whenever I was suffering from winter depression, because every time she’d call I would tell her I’m roasting a chicken. “That bad?” She’d ask. “Do I need to come out there and save you?” And once she even did come save me, making the four-hour drive from New Jersey to Cape Cod to pluck my sorry ass from the oyster-binging, chicken-roasting bowels of Seasonal Effective Disorder in coastal Massachusetts. (The winter of 2011, also known as “Snowpocalypse.”)

I’m not sure what it is about roasting a chicken that makes me feel better. Or maybe it doesn’t make me feel better. Maybe it’s more of a white flag; an act of surrendering to the lackluster days and nights of an endlessly blank, pleading season, soothing the paradoxically roiling malaise like Pepto Bismol for the soul.

Also, roasting a chicken is a far better idea than gorging yourself on stale grocery store brownies and an entire roll of Pillsbury cinnamon rolls. (Not that I’d know anything about that. Ahem.)

This mustard chicken recipe has all the things you need to temporarily quell the urge to buy the next plane ticket to Hawaii. It’s got brown sugar and stone-ground mustard and sweet potatoes, and I can’t even begin to express the cacophony of epic aromas that will float out of your kitchen about 20 minutes after you slide this bad boy into the oven. I butterflied this chicken because I wanted it to roast faster – butterflying flattens out the bird’s surface area and decreases cooking time. And, I was bored and really wanted to cut something with a new pair of kitchen shears I’d recently picked up.

It’s easy enough to butterfly a chicken yourself. Use some kitchen shears to cut up along the backbone, then remove the spine completely, along with the tail. Or you can ask your butcher to do it for you. Either way works. Once the cutting is done, lay the chicken out flat. This is also a great way to prep a chicken for grilling.

It’s worth mentioning that this chicken has the craziest, crispiest skin I’ve ever had on a roasted bird. It’s salty and crunchy, and just about the best thing ever when there’s nothing happening outside between alternating flurries of white and gray (and white and gray, and more white and gray). It involves very little work to prepare this recipe, so even those beginning home cooks will find this easy to win.

I hope this super easy chicken recipe brings you a little comfort in the dead of winter. And if you’re reading this from California, well, ppttthhhbbbtttttttttt.

Note: Some folks have recently asked for my sealed roasted chicken in a pot, which was originally from Dorie Greenspan’s book. That equally epic roast chicken recipe is right here.

 

... Read the rest of One-Pot Butterflied Brown Sugar Mustard Chicken Recipe on The Culinary Life.


Permalink | Posted in Gluten Free, Main Dishes, Recipes on Feb/Wed/2015
Post tags: , , , , ,
© Stephanie Stiavetti for The Culinary Life, 2015.

The post One-Pot Butterflied Brown Sugar Mustard Chicken Recipe appeared first on The Culinary Life.

]]>
https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/one-pot-butterflied-brown-sugar-mustard-chicken-recipe/feed/ 5
Cinnamon Apple Cake Recipe with Sour Cream https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/cinnamon-apple-cake-recipe-sour-cream/ https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/cinnamon-apple-cake-recipe-sour-cream/#comments Wed, 30 Nov -0001 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.theculinarylife.com/?p=15047   - For this little birthday, as apple cake recipe that takes 15 minutes to prepare. - Guess what? My 8th year blog birthday just passed! That’s right — back on February 4, 2006, I wrote my very first post, about vegan cupcakes. The photo is ridiculous and I didn’t even include a recipe. Wow, things […]

The post Cinnamon Apple Cake Recipe with Sour Cream appeared first on The Culinary Life.

]]>
 Cinnamon Apple Sour Cream Cake Recipe

- For this little birthday, as apple cake recipe that takes 15 minutes to prepare. -

Guess what? My 8th year blog birthday just passed! That’s right — back on February 4, 2006, I wrote my very first post, about vegan cupcakes. The photo is ridiculous and I didn’t even include a recipe. Wow, things have sure changed.

For one thing, this website was called “Wasabimon” back then, a weird nickname I’d picked up on BattleNet, an online gaming community. (Long story… I eventually became “NachoBiznatch” after that – another long story.) For years people thought I was either concentrating on Japanese food or a mommy blogger writing under the name “WasabiMom.” Neither was true, and for a long time I was actually posting gluten-free baking recipes while I tried to figure out some health stuff. To quell the confusion and give myself more flexibility, a few year later I changed the name to The Culinary Life in 2009.

I started this blog because friends were always asking me to share recipes, and it’s grown into so much more than that now. Soon I’m launching a new site that is currently under development, and it’s going to be a whole new world of food and cooking where I take folks of all skill levels and turn them into kitchen ninjas. I can’t wait to share it with you, but it’s not quite ready yet. For now, I’ve got a lovely apple cake recipe for you. Because what’s a birthday without a birthday cake?

... Read the rest of Cinnamon Apple Cake Recipe with Sour Cream on The Culinary Life.


Permalink | Posted in Baking and Sweets, Recipes on Feb/Wed/2015
Post tags: , , , ,
© Stephanie Stiavetti for The Culinary Life, 2015.

The post Cinnamon Apple Cake Recipe with Sour Cream appeared first on The Culinary Life.

]]>
https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/cinnamon-apple-cake-recipe-sour-cream/feed/ 17
Valentine’s Day White Chocolate Soufflé Recipe https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/valentines-day-white-chocolate-souffle-recipe/ https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/valentines-day-white-chocolate-souffle-recipe/#comments Wed, 30 Nov -0001 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.theculinarylife.com/?p=15260 - How about a pink and white chocolate soufflé recipe for Valentine’s Day? – Yes, please! When it comes to romance, can you think of a culture more associated with grand, sweeping gestures of love than the French? There’s a reason they call Paris “the city of love.” Then it makes sense to celebrate Valentine’s Day […]

The post Valentine’s Day White Chocolate Soufflé Recipe appeared first on The Culinary Life.

]]>
Valentine's Day White Chocolate Souffle on http://www.theculinarylife.com

- How about a pink and white chocolate soufflé recipe for Valentine’s Day? – Yes, please!

When it comes to romance, can you think of a culture more associated with grand, sweeping gestures of love than the French? There’s a reason they call Paris “the city of love.” Then it makes sense to celebrate Valentine’s Day with another simple dessert straight out of France’s pastry canon, a recipe for white chocolate soufflé. Plus soufflés only take about 10 minutes of work to create, so you’ll be able to spend your time doing, um, other things with your holiday. ... Read the rest of Valentine’s Day White Chocolate Soufflé Recipe on The Culinary Life.


Permalink | Posted in Baking and Sweets, Recipes on Feb/Wed/2015
Post tags: , , , ,
© Stephanie Stiavetti for The Culinary Life, 2015.

The post Valentine’s Day White Chocolate Soufflé Recipe appeared first on The Culinary Life.

]]>
https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/valentines-day-white-chocolate-souffle-recipe/feed/ 1
Dessert for Two: Valentine’s Day Coeur à la Crème https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/dessert-two-valentines-day-coeur-la-creme/ https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/dessert-two-valentines-day-coeur-la-creme/#comments Wed, 30 Nov -0001 00:00:00 +0000 http://www.theculinarylife.com/?p=15249 - Valentine’s Day Coeur à la Crème – perfect for two. - If you’re looking for a perfect Valentine’s Day dessert for two (after your special Valentine’s Day cheese plate, of course), look no further than the classic coeur à la crème, which literally means “heart of cream.” A traditional French treat, coeur à la crème is anything but […]

The post Dessert for Two: Valentine’s Day Coeur à la Crème appeared first on The Culinary Life.

]]>
Valentines Day Coeur a la Creme on http://www.theculinarylife.com

- Valentine’s Day Coeur à la Crème – perfect for two. -

If you’re looking for a perfect Valentine’s Day dessert for two (after your special Valentine’s Day cheese plate, of course), look no further than the classic coeur à la crème, which literally means “heart of cream.” A traditional French treat, coeur à la crème is anything but difficult to make, requiring only about ten minutes worth of actual work and then an overnight nap in the refrigerator. This recipe is basically a sweet, cream-cheesy filling poured into a heart-shaped mold. And it’s the perfect size to be shared! ... Read the rest of Dessert for Two: Valentine’s Day Coeur à la Crème on The Culinary Life.


Permalink | Posted in Baking and Sweets, Gluten Free, Recipes on Feb/Wed/2015
Post tags: , , ,
© Stephanie Stiavetti for The Culinary Life, 2015.

The post Dessert for Two: Valentine’s Day Coeur à la Crème appeared first on The Culinary Life.

]]>
https://www.theculinarylife.com/2015/dessert-two-valentines-day-coeur-la-creme/feed/ 2